Memory Problems?

Working with an Occupational Therapist may help to provide other tips and strategies for improving your memory or compensating for your poor memory.
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Memory is the ability to learn and remember information.

Memory involves three steps:

  1. Understanding the experience. (INPUT)
  2. Storing the experience in the brain. (STORAGE or THROUGH-PUT)
  3. Retrieving the memory or “remembering” the experience. (RETRIEVAL or OUT-PUT)

If you have difficulty with even one of these steps, you could experience difficulty with your memory.

Some examples of why you might struggle with memory: aphasia following a stroke; poor concentration or attention; distracted; language barriers; slower processing speed; concussion or brain injury; dementia; stress; depression; anxiety.

If you have problems with step 2, you will likely find learning new information very challenging. A few strategies to try include:

  • Break complex information into simple steps.
  • Write the steps down.
  • Practice the steps. Repetition is very important.
  • Allow ample time for the learning of new information – don’t rush.

Working with an Occupational Therapist may help to provide other tips and strategies for improving your memory or compensating for your poor memory.

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